Rust by Example

9.5 File hierarchy

Modules can be mapped to a file/directory hierarchy. Let's break down the visibility example in files:

$ tree .
.
|-- my
|   |-- inaccessible.rs
|   |-- mod.rs
|   `-- nested.rs
`-- split.rs
// split.rs
// This declaration will look for a file named `my.rs` or `my/mod.rs` and will
// insert its contents inside a module named `my` under this scope
mod my;

fn function() {
    println!("called `function()`");
}

fn main() {
    my::function();

    function();

    my::indirect_access();

    my::nested::function();
}
// my/mod.rs
// Similarly `mod inaccessible` and `mod nested` will locate the `nested.rs`
// and `inaccessible.rs` files and insert them here under their respective
// modules
mod inaccessible;
pub mod nested;

pub fn function() {
    println!("called `my::function()`");
}

fn private_function() {
    println!("called `my::private_function()`");
}

pub fn indirect_access() {
    print!("called `my::indirect_access()`, that\n> ");

    private_function();
}
// my/nested.rs
pub fn function() {
    println!("called `my::nested::function()`");
}

#[allow(dead_code)]
fn private_function() {
    println!("called `my::nested::private_function()`");
}
// my/inaccessible.rs
#[allow(dead_code)]
pub fn public_function() {
    println!("called `my::inaccessible::public_function()`");
}

Let's check that things still work as before:

$ rustc split.rs && ./split
called `my::function()`
called `function()`
called `my::indirect_access()`, that
> called `my::private_function()`
called `my::nested::function()`